Is it possible to take advantage of 2.5gbps networking over ethernet?

maximusppp
Grasshopper

I was very excited to hear that Shaw's new routers use 2.5gbps networking as advertised here.  After doing some speed tests between my home server and PC, both that have 2.5gbps rj45 jacks built into their motherboard, while using a CAT7 ethernet cable, I was let down to see that my speeds were still 1gbps.  Upon further research, I found that only one of the jacks on the new Shaw router is rated for 2.5gbps speeds.

My question is: since Shaw doesn't offer 2.5gbps internet (at least not where I live) what is the point of having only one 2.5gbps jack?  Is it possible (without purchasing a new router) to take advantage of 2.5gbps locally?  If not, what is the purpose of including (and advertising) 2.5gbps networking?

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4 Replies

I'd say 2.5gbps is into the "enthusiast" realm of interne...

swalter
Grasshopper

I'd say 2.5gbps is into the "enthusiast" realm of internet service, in which case you should absolutely be using your own third-party router and setting your Shaw modem to bridge mode in its settings. To take advantages of those speeds you will need some high end networking hardware. I recommend using something like the ASUS ROG line of routers, disabling the wifi, and then setting yourself up on Wifi 6 Unifi AP mesh which can start to take advantage of those speeds. Hardwire your new router to your 2.5mbps mobo to enjoy the speeds on that device though.

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While I somewhat agree that 2.5gbps networking could be l...

maximusppp
Grasshopper

While I somewhat agree that 2.5gbps networking could be labelled as enthusiast, my question still remains: what is the 2.5gbps port for and for whom are they advertising it? When my contract expired last month they called me and told me that their new router could do 2.5gbps networking. I had been on the fence about resubscribing but this was something that made me reconsider. Seems kind of like false advertising. 

You’re right about getting a new router, though. I have been putting that off for some time. Maybe I’ll build a pfsense machine and put it next to my unraid server!

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The 2.5gbps connection speed I believe is for future spee...

ThomasR
Grasshopper

The 2.5gbps connection speed I believe is for future speeds. I have a 2.5gbps network card in my PC and connect to the 2.5gbps port. I subscribe to Fibre + 1.5GB so I get 1.5gbps downloads. 

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-- what is the 2.5 Gbps port for and for whom are they ad...

mdk
Grand Master

@maximusppp -- what is the 2.5 Gbps port for and for whom are they advertising it? 

I can think of two reasons:

1. to "one-up" the speeds that TELUS advertises;

2. to the home where there are 3 (or more) computers each capable of consuming 1.0 Gbps. Together, they each get almost the maximum speed inherent in the computer's network-adapter card, namely about 940 Mbps, at the same time.

Note that 940 times as very-large power-of-two is about 1 times a not-quite-as-large power of 10.  Compare to measuring something in yards or in meters -- not exactly the same, but the rounded-off numbers are approximately the same.  When you purchase a "1 TB" (as a power of 10) disk-drive, Windows will report its capacity as "0.940 TB" (as a power of 2).

 

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