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Dedicated 2 separate Wi-Fi connections with Bluecurve

Grasshopper

When we first had the Bluecurve gateway installed two years ago, the technician set our household up to have two dedicated Wi-Fi lines; a 2.4 GHz and 5G one. He told us he was doing that so that we could specifically pick one of the two lines depending on the devices we were using. Fast forward two years and we are still running into dropped Wi-Fi connections in our basement (cell phones), particularly one of the bedrooms that’s furthest away from the modem. We can no longer count on being connected to Wi-Fi so we typically turn it off and just use our cellular data. We recently renewed our contract but are very much dependent on a solid connection as we have a university student now in our household. I tried setting up the Wi-Fi pod extenders, however, when I did that we no longer could find two separate Wi-Fi lines/networks. I was on the phone for over two hours with a tech trying to get the two separate lines set back up without any luck. I decided to disconnect the pods and remove them from our system. I just want things back the way they were; two lines, but I also need a better wifi connection in the basement. We are being sent a new modem but I am skeptical that this is going to fix the issue. Is it possible to set up the new modem and assign two dedicated Wi-Fi networks? Also, even if the Wi-Fi pods are the answer to guaranteeing no dropped connection in the basement, it is ridiculous that a person should have to rent them! At $10 a month, a person could buy a pretty darn good extender in a year! I am not convinced this is the answer and I don’t think I should be charged for it! I am starting to have regrets in dealing with Shaw. I understand safety is a concern during this time but not being able to have a technician come to my home is very frustrating. Dealing with Support over the phone absolutely sucks!

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I suggest you try the Gateway with the pods you have on h...

Master

@ChantL 

I suggest you try the Gateway with the pods you have on hand. Review your setup and location strategy of both the Gateway and the pods. Then allow a week for the gear to get it’s legs and figure out the MESH connections.

Don't get too hung up on renting v buying. This stuff changes so fast you will appreciate swapping older gear for newer gear as time goes on. 

Three useful apps for wifi testing:

BlueCurve home app

Shaw speed test

WiFi sweet spots

 

 

 

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--  From what I understand, I connect the ethernet cable...

Grand Master

@ChantL --  From what I understand, I connect the ethernet cable that is running from the back of my Shaw modem into this router in my basement.

Correct. There are two Ethernet sockets on the BlueCurve modem. The Ethernet cable leading to the basement can connect to either socket.  It would be good to place the basement router somewhere in the "middle" of the basement, to provide equally-strong signals at both "ends" of the basement.  Or, maybe, attempt to place it closer to the basement room with the worst connection to the BlueCurve's WiFi.

You do NOT want to "bridge" the BlueCurve, because you DO want WiFi on the main floor.

The other end of the Ethernet cable must connect to the "uplink" socket on the router in the basement, to enable you to run  laptops through that secondary router using Ethernet cables, or via wireless.

Yes, you will set up a totally different WiFi network for any wireless devices that will now connect to this new router.

Temporarily, use an Ethernet cable to connect a laptop to one port on this router. Hold down the "Windows" key on its keyboard, and tap the "R" key, to open a small window. Release the "Windows" key, and type CMD into that window, and press Enter. Into the window that opens, type IPCONFIG and press Enter. Look through the output for:

            Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

It might be some other IP-address, still starting with "192.168".

Start your web-browser, and type:  http://192.168.0.1 and press Enter, changing that "0.1" to the value that you see in the above output. You should see a "login" screen. There are to be 4 likely combinations to try:

  1. A "blank" ID with a "blank" password
  2. A "blank" ID with a password of "admin"
  3. An ID of "admin" with a "blank" password
  4. An ID of "admin" with a password of "admin"

Hopefully, one of these 4 will be successful. Then, you can navigate through the screens, to find the "WiFi" section, where you can configure an SSID of your choice, and must set a password.

> How complicated is this, and will it screw up anything with the shower modem?

I cannot advise taking any electrical appliance into an active shower. 

> Then it’s just a matter of someone using their cell phone or iPad downstairs and choosing to connect to the router which I have given a name to rather than our current Shaw network?

Correct. The WiFi-enabled device will show the SSID of the BlueCurve's WiFi, and the SSID of the other router. Select the SSID that gives the stronger signal. If you carry the cell-phone to a different location in the basement, the SSID of the "stronger" signal may change. In that case, connect to the "other" SSID.

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I think you answered your own question.  Pods will only w...

Master

I think you answered your own question. 

Pods will only work with band steering enabled, this would likely fix your issue, but you would need to pay the $10 a month. A new modem won’t fix the problem, you either need to try relocating the BlueCurve to a more central location, or use an extender. 

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Thank you for your reply! So you figured that the reason...

Grasshopper

Thank you for your reply! So you figured that the reason my two separate connections disappeared from my choices in connecting with Wi-Fi was because I hooked up these pods? If I did not feel like paying the monthly rental on the pods for X number of years and decided to buy my own extender from a retailer, do you have any idea if hook up is super simple with the bluecurve or will I be on the phone again dealing with a technician trying to guide me through a third-party purchase?

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I got the Nether AC1750 range extender and it is very eas...

Master

I got the Nether AC1750 range extender and it is very easy to set up. You can set your modem to use band steering or you can have the two separate networks. The nice thing about this extender is that it uses the same ssid and password, so the connection is automatic, like a mesh. 

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-- particularly one of the bedrooms that’s furthest away...

Grand Master

@ChantL -- particularly one of the bedrooms that’s furthest away from the modem.

In addition to the suggestions from @rstra  please note that the BlueCurve has two Ethernet sockets. Can you run an Ethernet cable down into the basement, and connect it to the "uplink" port on a third-party WiFi-capable router in the basement? Then, create a unique SSID for WiFi connections to that router, and hope that this router's WiFi signal will reach that bedroom?

 

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I’d like to preface this discussion with the statement th...

Grasshopper

I’d like to preface this discussion with the statement that I am not a computer techie kind of person! I do my best to research and become informed in that capacity. All the talk of band steering and separate SSIDs has got me scratching my head! I have come to the conclusion that I will be running an ethernet cable to the basement laptop to ensure a guaranteed connection. Now the problem is dealing with any Wi-Fi devices in the basement, like cellphones. What do I need to better the Wi-Fi connection and not have it dropped? Do I need a router, a Wi-Fi range extender, or a Wi-Fi powerline adapter? I am so opposed to renting the pods through Shaw only because of the monthly cumulative amount spent compared to the outright purchase of a third-party device!

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I suggest you try the Gateway with the pods you have on h...

Master

@ChantL 

I suggest you try the Gateway with the pods you have on hand. Review your setup and location strategy of both the Gateway and the pods. Then allow a week for the gear to get it’s legs and figure out the MESH connections.

Don't get too hung up on renting v buying. This stuff changes so fast you will appreciate swapping older gear for newer gear as time goes on. 

Three useful apps for wifi testing:

BlueCurve home app

Shaw speed test

WiFi sweet spots

 

 

 

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Thank you for the advice! That’s a good thing to keep I m...

Grasshopper

Thank you for the advice! That’s a good thing to keep I mind about technology changing. At least with renting, they will most likely continue to improve and upgrade devices!

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-- I have come to the conclusion that I will be running a...

Grand Master

@ChantL -- I have come to the conclusion that I will be running an ethernet cable to the basement laptop to ensure a guaranteed connection.

Well, if you are going to run an Ethernet cable to the basement, connect it to the "uplink" port on a third-party (Cisco Linksys or Netgear or D-Link) WiFi-cable router. Such a "pre-owned" router can be found on www.used.ca or Craig's List, for $20 to $30 dollars.

> Now the problem is dealing with any Wi-Fi devices in the basement, like cellphones.

On that router, configure an SSID for its wireless network. Then, the wireless devices (mobile phones, computers) in the basement can connect to that SSID.

> What do I need to better the Wi-Fi connection and not have it dropped?

See above.

> Do I need a router, a Wi-Fi range extender, or a Wi-Fi powerline adapter?

I know that a router will work. I know that a third-party WiFi range-extender will work.

A Powerline adapter is a substitute for an Ethernet cable strung down to the basement -- it will provide "wired" access to one computer in the basement. Or, instead of one computer, connect one third-party router, to provide both "wired" and "wireless" capability in the basement.

 

Finding "pre-owned" routers is getting easier, as Shaw replaces its older cable-modem-only devices by its newer "combination" boxes that are both a cable-modem and a router inside the one box.

OLDEST system -> Shaw cable -> Shaw cable-modem -> one wired computer.

OLDER system -> Shaw cable -> Shaw cable-modem -> third-party router -> up to 4 wired computers & many wireless devices.

NEW system -> Shaw cable -> Shaw "Hitron" or "Gateway" or "BlueCurve" -> both wired and wireless devices.

So, as Shaw customers upgrade -- the old cable-modem maxed-out at 25 Mbps -- their third-party router becomes "surplus" gear, and they list it for "cheap".

 

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Thanks for your information. I found a used router that I...

Grasshopper

@mdk 

Thanks for your information. I found a used router that I think I’m going to try. It’s the TP-Link Archer C7 AC1750 router. I hope it’s a good choice. 

I hope set up is easy enough for someone that’s not computer savvy! From what I understand, I connect the ethernet cable that is running from the back of my Shaw modem into this router in my basement. Then I can run laptops through the wireless router using ethernet cables as well (or just wireless). You said the following:

On that router, configure an SSID for its wireless network. Then, the wireless devices (mobile phones, computers) in the basement can connect to that SSID.

 

Do you mean I’m setting up a totally different network for any wireless devices that will now run to this new router? How complicated is this and will it screw up anything with the shower modem? Then it’s just a matter of someone using their cell phone or iPad downstairs and choosing to connect to the router which I have given a name to rather than our current Shaw network?

 

Forgive my ignorance; I’m trying to teach myself how to make this work!

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